CHAPTER 21

OBITUARY (Noun)

Meaning: An article about the life of someone who has died recently

Use: Henry saw his friend’s obituary in the local newspaper that morning which revealed his many achievements in the town before he passed away.

NECROLOGY (Noun)

Meaning: An article about the life of someone who has died recently

Use: The club’ s founder recently died, and this month’ s newsletter includes a lengthy necrology.

OBIT (Noun)

Meaning: An article about the life of someone who has died recently

Use: She reads the obits as soon as she gets her morning paper.

 

Explanation: Stout (Adj.) means fat. It has second meaning also. It means brave and determined. It has third meaning also. It means a very dark and heavy beer.

Plump (Adj.) means slightly overweight or having a full rounded shape. For example – He was a plump boy.

Plump (Verb) means to become fat. It has second meaning also. It also means to sit, lie down or fall suddenly in an awkward way. For example – She plumped down on the bed. It has third meaning also. It also means to favor or decide in favor of someone or something.

OBESE (Adj.)

Meaning: Very fat

Use: A neighbor told Karen that her obese, or corpulent, dog looked like a big sausage walking on legs.

ROTUND (Adj.)

Meaning: Fat and round

Use: The rotund woman compressed her lips, “Secrets must not be shared”.

CORPULENT (Adj.)

Meaning: Fat

Use: The doctor advised his corpulent patient to lose weight for the sake of his health.

STOUT (Adj.)

Meaning: 1) Fat

2) Brave and determined

Use: She was stout, middle-aged, and veiny in the cheeks and nose.

STOUT (Noun)

Meaning: A very dark and heavy bear

PLUMP (Adj.)

Meaning: Full and rounded in shape

Use: How do you make thin boys fat? You throw them up in the air and they come down plump!

PLUMP (Verb)

Meaning: 1) To become plump

2) To drop or sink suddenly or heavily

3) To favor or decide in favor of someone or something strongly

Use: Consuelo came home tired and decided to plump on the couch in the living room.

 

Explanation: Omen (Noun), Augury (Noun), Portent (Noun), Prognostication (Noun), Herald (Noun), Harbinger (Noun) and Presage (Noun) means sign or warning of something that will happen in future. Herald (Noun) also means an official messenger in past.

Presage (Verb), Bode (Verb), Portend (Verb), Harbinger (Verb), Herald (Verb) means to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future. Forebode (Verb) means to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future especially something bad. Herald (Verb) has second meaning also. It means to greet (someone or something) with enthusiasm.

OMEN (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: An increase in exports might be an omen of economic recovery.

AUGURY (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: A yearbook augury that of all the graduates, he would be the most likely to succeed.

PORTENT (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The arrival of the seagulls in the farmer’s field often is the portent that it will rain in about two hours.

PROGNOSTICATION (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The complete fulfillment of his prognostication surprised even him.

HARBINGER (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: It’s just that its call is the harbinger of spring- a signal to start chucking chlorine into the swimming pool.

HARBINGER (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The warmer weather might be a harbinger that spring is finally coming.

HERALD (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: For eight centuries they have been the heralds of spring, as sure a sign of impending blue skies and falling blossom as the song of swallows and the appearance of tulips.

HERALD (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The speech heralded a change in policy.

PRESAGE (Noun)

Meaning: sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The sight of the first robin is always a welcome presage of spring.

PRESAGE (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: Many investors are very worried that the current slowdown could presage another recession.

BODE (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use:  The reading of the astrological signs bodes great happiness for the newlywed couple.

PORTEND (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future

Use: The thunder and lightning portended a storm was about to take place.

FOREBODE (Verb)

Meaning: to be a sign or warning of something that will happen in future especially something bad

Use: Joe’s harsh words with his wife foreboded a bad relationship.

 

PREMONITION (Noun)

Meaning: A feeling or belief that something is going to happen

Use: Jack remembers that before the earthquake took place, his two dogs were restless and greatly disturbed; as if, they had premonitions that the shaking of the area was about to happen.

PROGNOSIS (Noun)

Meaning: A feeling or belief that something is going to happen especially of the likely course of an illness

Use: The doctor’s prognosis for a full recovery pleased the patient very much.

 

CLAIRVOYANCE (Noun)

Meaning: Power claiming to see into the future

Use: Joseph claimed to have clairvoyance which consisted of acute perceptions and intuitive insights for people in their present existence and for the future.

FORESIGHT (Noun)

Meaning: The ability to see what will or might happen in future

Use: He had the foresight to check that his escape route was clear.

PRESCIENCE (Noun)

Meaning: The ability to know what will or might happen in future

Use: Given the current wave of Japan-bashing, it does not take prescience for me to foresee problems in our future trade relations with Japan.

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