CHAPTER 9 on Vocabulary

AUSTERE (Adj.)

Meaning- 1) Simple and suggesting strict self-denial.

2) rigorously self-disciplined and severely moral; ascetic; abstinent.

3) Severely plain in design or lines, without distractions or decoration.

4) Suggesting physical hardship in order to get profit.

Synonym- STRICT, STERN, SEVERE

Uses-

  • Greece is being forced to establish more austere expenditures because of their monetary debts.
  • Harry was an austere man with a rigidly strict lifestyle.
  • Some austere people are very self-controlled and serious or even sad and gloomy.
  • They live an austere quality of life in the convent.

                               

AVARICE (Noun)

Meaning- A strong desire to have or get money.

Mnemonic trick- The word avarice sounds similar to ‘our rise’. In spite of having good family business and money, our family wants to rise above and we want to expand our business. We have avarice for rising above in life. Therefore, avarice means strong desire to have or get money.

Synonym- ACQUISITIVENESS, GREED, COVETOUSNESS, RAPACITY, AVIDITY

Uses-

  • Avarice is the most marked characteristics of Tibetans.
  • Don’ t let avarice for riches control you.

 

AVARICIOUS (Adj.)

 

Meaning- Characterized by an extremely strong desire for accumulating property and to keep material wealth.

Synonym- ACQUISITIVE, GREEDY, COVETOUS, MERCENARY, RAPACIOUS, AVID

Synonym explanation- Avaricious, Acquisitive, greedy, covetous mean having or showing the strong desire for, especially material possessions. There is a small difference between their meanings.

Avaricious implies the desire for money and suggests stinginess. Greedy suggests lack of restraint in desire. Covetous implies strong desire especially for something belonging to someone else. Acquisitive implies both eagerness to possess and ability to acquire and keep.

Avid implies enthusiasm or willingness to work hard and desire to the point of greed.

Mercenary gives reference to a person who cares only about making money especially a soldier who got hired by a foreign country to fight in its army.

Uses-

  • The avaricious nature of the miser was revealed when someone saw him counting his large amount of money.
  • The young man seemed motivated by an avaricious desire to please people for the sake of the material rewards he would receive.
  • He blames all his problems on avaricious lawyers.
  • Avaricious developers are trying to tear down the historical monument and build a hotel.

 

 AVER (Verb)

Meaning- Declare or affirm with confidence, say.

Uses-

  • “Despite your insistence that ethics are completely situational,” said the philosophy professor, “ I aver that the existence of natural rights inevitably leads to certain immutable ethical boundaries”.
  • Janet averred that she did not cheat on the test, although another student told the teacher that she did.
  • During the trial, the witness averred that he had seen the accused person at the scene of the crime.

 

BANAL (Adj.)

Meaning- 1) Descriptive of something boring, unoriginal or stale.

2) Dull, especially due to overuse or over-familiarity.

Synonym- INSIPID, MUNDANE, VAPID, DULL

Uses-

  • There were no new ideas in the politician’ s banal speech.
  • The editor rejected the author’ s work because it was too banal.
  • Students living in hostel find the food menu very banal.
  • He made some banal remarks about the movie.

 

BANISH (Verb)

 

Meaning- 1) to send someone away from a country or place as an official punishment.

2) to abolish, to forbid, or to get rid of that which is not wanted.

Synonym- DEPORT, EXILE, EXPATRIATE

Uses-

  • The illegal aliens were banished back to their country.
  • Raj banished any further relations with her unfaithful wife.
  • For health reasons, Mike and his wife decided to banish the excessive use of sugar in their diets.

 

1  ……………………………………………………………………………. 8 9 10 ……………………….. 30

 

 

                               

 

 

 

 

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